If you’re currently taking a course that includes some organic chemistry, today’s graphic might be a handy reference! It summarises a selection of benzene derivatives, including their common names and systematic names.

You can read a little more about them and download the graphic here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-rw

This year’s Longitude Prize is focused on the growing problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria. They’ve put together a nice image, shown here, which showcases what they term ‘the ten most dangerous antibiotic resistant bacteria’. You can read more detail on each of them here:http://www.nesta.org.uk/news/antibiotic-resistant-bacteria

The prize offers a £10 million prize fund for the development of a cheap, accurate, and easy to use bacterial infection test kit, which will allow doctors to prescribe the correct antibiotics at the correct time for patients, to try to help minimise the development of antibiotic resistance.

copesetic:

compoundchem:

A final word on insect venoms, with a look at the Schmidt Pain Index, developed by Dr. Justin Schmidt to rank the pain of the various insect stings he experienced in his line of work. Whilst obviously pain is subjective, and you’d expect some variation from person to person, it still makes for an interesting graphic!

You can see a larger version at the foot of yesterday’s post, here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-rb

I thought velvet ants were considered wasps. >:

It seems they are indeed! I got caught out by that one, assuming from the name that they were ants. I’ll blame being a chemist; I assumed biologists would name things based on what they are, so I didn’t double check :) I’ll change it on the post on the site!

A final word on insect venoms, with a look at the Schmidt Pain Index, developed by Dr. Justin Schmidt to rank the pain of the various insect stings he experienced in his line of work. Whilst obviously pain is subjective, and you’d expect some variation from person to person, it still makes for an interesting graphic!

You can see a larger version at the foot of yesterday’s post, here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-rb

tabletopwhale:

This week I made an animated chart of butterflies! These are all butterflies that you can find throughout North America, and I picked the 42 that I thought were the most colorful and unique. 

You can check out the full sized GIF here or pick up a poster for your room here :)

Whilst we’re on the subject of insects this evening, here’s a great poster on some altogether nicer members of the insect class. This would work fantastically as one of those holographic posters!

Today’s post examines some of the chemical components of bee, wasp, hornet and ant venoms. Also, in the accompanying post, why you can’t really use knowledge of acids and alkalis to neutralise bee stings, how ants can create ionic liquids, and what bee attack pheromones smell like.

See a bigger version of the graphic & read the post here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-rb

Followers of the site on Twitter or Facebook might have already spotted this graphic. If you’re unaware of the Food Babe, or her latest crusade of misinformation regarding chemicals in Starbucks’ Pumpkin Spice Latte, then this post might not make much sense, but you can at least be thankful you’ve had a facepalm-free day. If you have spotted some of the fallout of her ‘revelations’, here’s a quick image I threw together for you to show to anyone who’s unsure about the claims being bandied around.

Now, I don’t even like Starbucks all that much (and confess to never having had a Pumpkin Spice Latte). I’m also all for transparency about the various substances added to food and drinks. However, spreading wilful misinformation about chemicals added to food isn’t helping matters at all in that regard - if anything, it’s only going to make manufacturers more reticent to make publicly available the ingredients in their products, for fear of the scientifically illiterate coming at them with pitchforks.

References:

Here’s another graph on insect stings I came across during research for tomorrow’s post. This one looks at how the painfulness of a bee sting varies by location. The author himself submitted to repeated stings in various locations to find out where they hurt the most. Now that’s dedication to research.

I feel that I should also point out that stinging locations included the penis shaft and scrotum. BECAUSE THE PUBLIC NEEDS TO KNOW.

Source: http://www.joshuastevens.net/visualization/visual-guide-to-painful-insect-stings/

Came across this interesting graph, showing the lethality of various insect stings, whilst doing research for tomorrow’s post on insect venoms. (Note that it’s based purely on the toxicity of venoms, and ignores secondary effects, such as anaphylaxis).

Source: http://www.joshuastevens.net/visualization/visual-guide-to-painful-insect-stings/

The second graphic in the ‘Undeserved Reputations’ series looks at Monosodium Glutamate, or MSG, and the myths surrounding it. 

You can see a larger version of the graphic and read more here: http://wp.me/s4aPLT-msg

There’s also a great ACS Reactions video on the subject here: http://bit.ly/MSGreactions